Human Life is Sacred: What the death penalty, abortion, birth control, and 9/11 can teach us about the intersection of homicide and suicide

For a couple of years now I have come to believe that the death penalty should not be enforced. By this, I am not saying that the death penalty should not exist or that the death penalty should be abolished. On the contrary, there are acts that are so heinous that justice demands a sentence of death! However, once pronounced, humanity must step in and commute death to life imprisonment…unless the offender consents. Continue reading “Human Life is Sacred: What the death penalty, abortion, birth control, and 9/11 can teach us about the intersection of homicide and suicide”

A Quick Note on Gender & Anatomical Sex

Gender and sex are not the same. Biological sex is defined by anatomy and genetics. Gender, however, refers to the manifestation of physiological sex. A person whose gender and sex are congruent are termed cisgender. A person whose gender and sex are not congruent may be (over broadly) considered transgender,, but that does not necessarily mean the person intends to undergo medical sex reassignment or intends to live as a different gender. More appropriately it simply means that the person transcends binary gender much in the way that D-block elements on the periodic table are transmetals or transitional elements because they have properties that are metallic and nonmetallic

Gender can influence sexuality but gender is not determinative of sexuality. In actuality, there are three components at work: Gender Identity, Gender Expression, and Sexual Orientation. Continue reading “A Quick Note on Gender & Anatomical Sex”

Gender Equality in the Shadow of 1960s Civil Rights

The outside temperature reached 103° F one recent July afternoon in south Georgia. I once experienced even hotter temperatures in Spain a decade ago, but the gulf humidity here is a beast of a different kind. I bounced to a thrift store in search of extensively used (i.e. breathable) medical scrubs. Little did I know that this simple mission would ignite a profound inquiry into gender equality.

I did not find scrubs suited to my quest, but hanging right beside the roundabout was a plain, charred olive A-line miniskirt. It struck me as an even better heat-buster and the skirt looked so sensible and professional as to remind me of my days in the corporate offices of a large regional bank. Gender equality afforded women the option to wear pants many decades ago so what was stopping me from enjoying the comfort of a skirt? As progressive as that bank was in its employee policies, I think management would have fairly and intellectually considered the prospect. Unfortunately, I suspect my subsequent world of public academia is not as capable of cerebral contemplation on issues of gender normativity.

Continue reading “Gender Equality in the Shadow of 1960s Civil Rights”